Tuesday, 7 February 2012

Kendal Tapestry

David and I spent the weekend in Kendal and I had chance to have another look around the fascinating Quaker Meeting House and the Tapestry Exhibition.  If you are in the area at any point, it's well worth a visit.  Parking is difficult, so its probably best to use the multistory and walk across the road.

The tapestry tells of Quaker events and insights and is a celebration of the significant contribution these quiet, non-conformists have made to the modern world. Stories from the forefront of the industrial revolution, developments in science and medicine, astronomy, the abolition of slavery, social reform, and ecology are all revealed from within the stunning needlework.

Completed in 1996, the result is 77 panels of narrative ‘crewel’ type embroidery on specially woven wool cloth. With each panel measuring 25" (635mm) by 21" (533mm) it is testament to the passion and shared sense of community of an amazing group of Friends.

http://www.quaker-tapestry.co.uk/the-exhibition/about-the-tapestry/

3 comments:

  1. I agree - if you are in the area do make the time to go. Not only are the tapestries elegantly designed and beautifully executed, the story behind them is very interesting; it will keep most (unwilling) men interested too!

    In the process of working out which kind of stitch would be easiest for people around the world to learn to stitch uniformly the designer actually made up a new stitch that has been accepted asa a genuinely "new stitch".

    Who did that, Gail? Was it the Embroiderer's Guild?

    There is a cafe attached to the museum and we enjoyed an excellent coffee there.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree - if you are in the area do make the time to go. Not only are the tapestries elegantly designed and beautifully executed, the story behind them is very interesting; it will keep most (unwilling) men interested too!

    In the process of working out which kind of stitch would be easiest for people around the world to learn to stitch uniformly the designer actually made up a new stitch that has been accepted asa a genuinely "new stitch".

    Who did that, Gail? Was it the Embroiderer's Guild?

    There is a cafe attached to the museum and we enjoyed an excellent coffee there.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Virginia - I think that it was the Royal School of Needlework, but it would be interesting to find out more from them. I'll email today and see if I get a response.

    ReplyDelete